Emotional Intelligence Among Healthcare Leaders

Originally published on August 31, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com. By Anita Hardidat, Ph.D

Within the past several years, there has been a renewed interest in the concept of emotional intelligence (EI) since it can play a role regarding performance, competencies and overall outcomes in an organization. When leaders use their EI abilities, high quality care can be served to patients and there is an allowance to align with other employees in a positive and beneficial manner. In essence, the definition of emotional intelligence is looked at as an ability to recognize others and manage the emotions and actions within a person’s self.  In practical terms, when individuals are aware of their own emotions, this can drive the impact of other people.

In today’s society, the use of applicable EI is often accepted as a primary attribute of success among any field. Specifically, within health care, leaders are required to have intellectual capabilities, but if they go the extra mile and strive for interpersonal competency, performance levels may be impacted since emotional intelligence is associated with factors such as change tolerance, communication skills, time management, decision making, trust and accountability. If these concepts are not applied in a proper manner, there is a strong susceptibility for failure which can be detrimental for each individual that is involved.

 

Emotional intelligence if often looked at as a balance that occurs between the rational and emotional portion of the brain. With repeated training, the brain can generate new pathways in order to make the EI behaviors ultimate habits that can be used each day.  For example, it is beneficial for health care leaders to facilitate a strong sense of self awareness. This means that emotions should be recognized and then managed in a proper way.  Once this takes place, there is a need to have self-regulation. Although emotions may fluctuate on a daily basis, successful leaders are aware of potential ramifications. They understand how to manage impulses and how to maintain professional standards among the employees within an organization.  Upon successful self-regulation, staff members may feel a sense of trustworthiness and it is likely that they may take responsibility for their own actions as well. The idea of applicable social skills is another main factor that is associated with emotional intelligence. For any leader, there is an ability to influence others, but this can only be done when there are levels of proper communication, understanding and collaboration. Successful leaders build strong teams by using their own EI skills and they create a positive synergy where collective goals can be managed.

For beneficial effectiveness, leaders must understand how their emotions and actions impact the people that surround them on both a personal and professional level. For those individuals who use EI on a daily basis, he or she can work well with others and there is a strong likelihood that the level of relatability can increase as well. Furthermore, when employees feel valued, the level of success can increase tremendously as time progresses.

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

About the Author:

Anita Haridat has her Ph.D in healthcare/business administration and her master’s degree in clinical nutrition. She has several publications in sources such as EGO Magazine, Natural Awakenings Magazine, Syosset Patch, Our USA Magazine and many more. Her passion for health and wellness has created multiple stepping stones for paving the way of creating a positive well being. Her first book can be found here:

A Ph.D Takes Your B.S to a Whole New Level: Survive Grad School with the Right Mentality

 

 

How to Prevent a HIPAA Security Breach

Originally published on August 21, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Sonda Eunus, MHA

It is crucial and mandated by federal law for healthcare organizations to ensure the privacy and security of PHI. Many acts of neglect, willful or not, can be considered violations of HIPAA. In a video titled Privacy and Security: The New HIPAA Rule, we are given three examples of violations: a hospital in Michigan accidentally posting over a thousand patients’ PHI online, a health insurer losing the financial and personal information of over 450,000 customers, and several pharmacy chains improperly disposing of medical records in dumpsters instead of by using appropriate disposal methods such as shredding. These examples are extreme and include cases that affected a great number of people; however, violations that only affect a few individuals are also cause for concern because they shed light on a problem in the organization’s privacy and security policies and procedures. The fines for security breaches are hefty, ranging from $100 to $50,000 depending on the scope of the violation, as well as whether or not the violation was made unwittingly or as an act of uncorrected, willful neglect with full knowledge of the law. These fines correspond to 4 tiers of violations increasing in culpability, as set by the HIPAA Omnibus Rule (Sterling, 2015). Measures can be implemented to avoid such HIPAA violations and security breaches, and it is crucial for management to routinely conduct thorough analyses of their organization to identify potentially risky areas or behaviors. Whereas an internal security audit is better than no audit, it is also important to undergo a professional Security Risk Analysis (SRA) which may identify new factors that may not have previously been considered. Additionally, an annual SRA is now required in order to attest for Meaningful Use.

 

In the event of a security breach that involves more than 500 people, several steps are required by the Breach Notification Rule. First, the organization must provide individual notice to all persons affected by the breach. Ideally, this should be done in the form of a letter sent by first-class mail, but can also be done by email if the individual affected had previously agreed to receiving such notifications by email. If more than 10 people affected are unreachable due to inaccurate contact information, the organization must post a public notice about the breach for at least 90 days on their website, in broadcast print, or by use of media. Second, the media must be notified of the breach, most commonly done by holding a press release in the affected area. Finally, the organization must also notify the Secretary by going to the HHS website and filling out a breach report form (HHS, 2016).

 

In the event of a security breach that involves less than 500 people, individual notice to all affected persons is required, but the media does not necessarily need to be notified. Additionally, in a breach involving less than 500 individuals, the Secretary does not need to be notified immediately—such breaches can be reported to the Secretary on an annual basis (HHS, 2016). However, regardless of scope, security breaches can take a huge toll on the organization in several ways—it will cost the organization a significant amount of money both in fines and in reparation efforts, will take up time and resources in order to appropriately notify all affected individuals and the HHS Secretary, and will also tarnish the organization’s reputation. It is therefore crucial for management to be well-versed in privacy and security regulations, and to ensure that all measures are taken to avoid security breaches.

 

The main causes of HIPAA violations include lack of knowledge, low security, unauthorized users or unnecessary access to PHI, and simple neglect. To address lack of knowledge, healthcare office managers must take several measures. First, a policies and procedures manual must be kept updated and revised as new opportunities for violations arise, such as in the case of new technology or devices being implemented. Our practice recently started using a mobile app through our EMR, which allows providers to access PHI from their smartphones. They are able to access patients’ charts, send prescription refills or lab orders, and perform other tasks that may be necessary for an on-call provider who may not otherwise have access to the EMR system at that moment. Such new features, although beneficial for patient care, open up new opportunities for security breaches. To address such risks, a new policy must be added to the policies and procedures manual, and precautions must be taken such as requiring that the providers accessing the mobile app utilize a complex password to access their phones (in addition to the login credentials needed to access the mobile app). Staff trainings must be done on a regular basis to review the policies and procedures in place, as well as to introduce any new policies. In our organization we also subject all employees to HIPAA testing after training, to ensure that they understand what they have learned. It is not enough to simply conduct yearly HIPAA training, especially considering the fact that new employees may be hired after the yearly training has already been done. These new employees must immediately be subjected to a thorough training on what constitutes a HIPAA violation, and how to prevent such occurrences within the organization. A Privacy and Security Officer must be designated so that all employees have someone to turn to when they have questions or if situations arise that they are not sure how to handle appropriately.

 

Low security must be addressed by a Health IT professional, who can take steps such as preventing access to certain sites, using a secured network, installing firewalls and other antivirus programs, creating unique desktop and EMR login credentials and complex passwords for users, encrypting data, as well as remote data wiping in the event that a device containing PHI is lost or stolen (Cohen & Difiore, 2014). Unauthorized access to PHI can be monitored through random log audits to ensure that users are only accessing PHI on a need-to-know basis. Additionally, users can be placed in categories with different sets of permissions based on their roles and job functions. For example, front office staff does not need the same access to PHI as a healthcare provider or medical assistant involved in direct patient care. Additionally, physical measures can be taken such as implementing screen protectors to ensure that other patients or unauthorized individuals cannot see an employee’s screen. It is important for staff to be trained to log out of their EMR system when leaving their workstation so that unauthorized users cannot access PHI under their login credentials. It is crucial that no patient information is left laying around on desks at the end of the workday so that individuals such as the cleaning crew do not have access to PHI. Furthermore, any such individuals that conduct business with the organization should have signed a Business Associates Agreement as well as a Workforce Confidentiality Agreement that briefs them on the importance of protecting PHI.

 

It is not always easy for an organization to ensure full HIPAA compliance. It may in fact be very difficult to implement, especially in a practice or facility that has high employee turnover, and no time or no qualified person to regularly train all staff. However, when faced with the serious penalties and consequences that may arise from not being fully compliant, it is important to dedicate time and effort to this cause. The main key to reducing potential violations, aside from technological safeguards, is the proper training of all employees, the designation of a knowledgeable and thorough Privacy and Security Officer, as well as the existence of a clearly-defined, updated, and accessible policies and procedures manual in place in case an employee has any doubt about whether a specific act or behavior constitutes a violation.

 

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

 

About the Author:

Sonda Eunus is the Founder and CEO of Leading Management Solutions, a healthcare management consulting company (www.lmshealthpro.com). Along with a team of experienced and knowledgeable consultants, she works with healthcare practice managers to improve practice operations, train employees, increase practice revenue, and much more. She holds a Masters in Healthcare Management and a BA in Psychology.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonda-eunus-6895067b

 

 

Shortage of Primary Care Physicians and the Rise of Midlevel Providers

Originally published on August 21, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Sonda Eunus, MHA

Since the passing of the ACA, the healthcare workforce has dealt with an immense influx of newly insured patients requiring medical attention. It is estimated that 32 million people will be newly insured by 2019 as a result of the ACA (Carrier, Stark, & Yee, 2011). There is a gross inadequacy in professional healthcare worker distribution across different healthcare settings which may leave our nation ill-prepared for this new patient population. The biggest discrepancy exists in the fact that specialists outnumber general practitioners by nearly two to one (Barton, 2010). Whereas this trend is supported by the increased reimbursement rates received by specialists, it actually negatively affects the healthcare workforce by encouraging the emergence of specialists when in reality generalists are more direly needed. The ACA attempts to make up for these discrepancies by establishing incentives for primary care practitioners. An estimated $3.5 billion was invested by the ACA into the primary care provider bonus from 2011-2016, in which Medicare paid a 10% bonus over the established physician fee schedule for general care provided by primary care physicians, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, or physician assistants practicing family medicine, internal medicine, geriatrics, or pediatrics (Stone & Bryant, 2012).

 

One way in which primary care practices have been making up for this shortage of physicians is by utilizing physician extenders such as advanced nurse practitioners and physician assistants. The increasing independence and scope of practice of these midlevel providers also make these healthcare professionals a valuable resource that may help increase access to primary care. These midlevel providers often perform duties which overlap with those of physicians, including assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of patients, and both practice with “considerable clinical autonomy” (Morgan, Short, & Strand De Oliveira, 2011). Whereas the utilization of these midlevel providers in combined workforce planning appears to be part of the solution to the physician shortage, it has met several barriers in practice. These barriers include “lack of data on some professions, professional interest in protecting turf, competing agendas, and entrenched habits of state bureaucracies and professional organizations” (Morgan, Short, & Strand De Oliveira, 2011).

 

In the state of Florida, these midlevel providers have not yet achieved “full practice” status. Currently 21 states and the District of Columbia have granted nurse practitioners such freedom. In those full-practice states, NPs can treat patients independently, as well as open their own practices without physician supervision (Simmons, 2015). One crippling limitation on the nurse practitioner’s scope of practice in Florida is that she cannot prescribe controlled medications, and for that reason only physicians can see patients with complex mental health or behavioral issues in our pediatric primary care practice. Reimbursement rates for services rendered by midlevel providers are 80% of the physician fee schedule. However, considering the fact that these midlevel providers’ salaries are approximately half that of a physician, as well as that there are many more midlevel candidates than physician candidates applying for positions, hiring midlevel providers may be one of the best solutions to combating the current shortage of primary care physicians and increasing patient access to care. Additionally, areas that have shortages of primary care, dental, or mental health providers are designated as Health Professional Shortage Areas (HPSA) by the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). Practices in those designated HPSA areas can qualify as National Health Service Corps (NHSC) sites, and healthcare providers employed by them then become eligible for student loan forgiveness. Our site is a designated NHSC site, and we have a great advantage in recruiting midlevel providers seeking loan repayment.

 

In conclusion, efforts must be made to encourage the education of more general practitioners, be they physicians, physician assistants, or nurse practitioners. The demand for these general healthcare professionals will only increase, and we need to be well-prepared to provide these services to the growing patient population. By involving midlevel practitioners in workforce planning and utilizing them at the peak of their education and productivity, physicians will be freed from these duties and therefore will be made available to tackle more complex cases which require their extended physician education and expertise. It is therefore crucial that the remaining states, including Florida, that have not yet granted midlevel providers “full practice” status reevaluate their decisions in order to increase patient access to greatly needed quality medical care.

 

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

About the Author:

Sonda Eunus is the Founder and CEO of Leading Management Solutions, a healthcare management consulting company (www.lmshealthpro.com). Along with a team of experienced and knowledgeable consultants, she works with healthcare practice managers to improve practice operations, train employees, increase practice revenue, and much more. She holds a Masters in Healthcare Management and a BA in Psychology.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonda-eunus-6895067b

 

 

Physician Compensation Models

Originally published on August 21, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Sonda Eunus, MHA

In order for a practice to succeed, a strong physician-compensation system must be in place to both incentivize the physicians as well as to make sure that profits are maximized. Equal salaried compensation does not account for the physicians’ differences in performance, productivity, quality, and delivery of patient care. It may be hard to implement a new compensation model into an already existent practice, and there is always initial opposition to new ways of doing things. However, it may be well worth the effort as with a little planning and added accountability, the right incentives can truly drive profits up and engage the physicians. Engaged physicians lead to higher caliber patient care, increased revenues, a greater work environment, and the growth of the practice overall—happier physicians lead to happier patients. Multiple compensation models exist, each with its own merits and drawbacks. I have listed several of the most common models below.

 

The Revenue Compensation model is the most straightforward—the higher the revenue generated by a physician, the higher the compensation for that physician. This model is the simplest to understand and implement. Financial reports can easily identify the revenue generated by claims billed for a specific physician during a given timeframe. However, this model neglects to measure the factors that go into patient care, as well as the costs of running a healthcare practice, and may therefore not be perceived as equitable. It also does not create adequate incentive measures.

 

The Net Income model is similar to the revenue model, but also takes into account the costs incurred by the physician while generating the revenue: the greater the revenue and the lower the costs, the higher the physician compensation. This leads to a closer relationship between physician performance and compensation. However, taking costs into account comes at a cost—there is no straightforward way to allocate practice costs to individual physicians, and doing so may be costly and time-consuming.

 

The Base Salary plus Productivity model is one in which a portion of the physician’s income is fixed, but the remaining portion is based on some measure of productivity. This is a compromise between the traditional compensation method and a productivity-based method, and has several benefits. First, since there is already a base salary, the productivity incentives do not need to be as drastic as in a strictly productivity-based method. Second, the physicians are guaranteed to make a portion of their income regardless of patient volume, which may not always be in their control and may reduce seasonally.

 

Finally, the Multiple Factor Performance model rewards physicians for productivity and non-financial factors as well. This system is a lot more complex in design and may cost some money to implement. However, it has its benefits as it encourages physicians to provide quality and not just quantity; and with good quality come repeat patients, and higher revenues in the long run. Additionally, as commercial and federal payers are moving closer and closer to a quality-based payment system as opposed to a fee-for-service one, it would be of great benefit to the practice to incentivize physicians to meet quality measures.

 

The model that I would recommend is one of a Base Salary plus Multiple Factor Performance. Each physician should have a reasonably set salary base, but should also be held accountable for meeting productivity and quality measures in order to receive performance bonuses. These measures can include patient volumes, chart completion, patient satisfaction, continuing education, reduction of ER/urgent care visits, compliance with meaningful use requirements, proactive care for chronic condition population sets, and other such desirable behaviors. There can also be a common goal of reducing costs, and the amounts saved can be distributed among the whole staff, not just the physicians in order to engage ancillary staff in the growth of the practice as well. The physician compensation models outlined above can also apply to midlevel providers such as Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners and Physician Assistants.

 

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

About the Author:

Sonda Eunus is the Founder and CEO of Leading Management Solutions, a healthcare management consulting company (www.lmshealthpro.com). Along with a team of experienced and knowledgeable consultants, she works with healthcare practice managers to improve practice operations, train employees, increase practice revenue, and much more. She holds a Masters in Healthcare Management and a BA in Psychology.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonda-eunus-6895067b

 

Marketing Your Practice with Social Media

Originally published on August 20, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Kristen Brady

:-  There is no question that social media has changed the way that businesses are marketed. As a healthcare provider, privacy is extremely important which may be why many practices avoid the use of social media as a marketing tool. However, by following a few tips, any practice can tap into the many options for marketing in social media and still maintain the privacy of their patients.

 

 

Why Use Social Media?

 

Before learning tips for using social media, it is important to understand why a medical practice would want to use it as a promotional tool. One of the best reasons for using social media is that it provides an easy way to connect with patients in a real-time manner. It may be easier to think of social media as word-of-mouth promotion as many people ask their friends and family to recommend a healthcare provider. Social media is another way for people to ask for referrals and get information about healthcare providers in the area. It also allows physicians to engage with patients in an informal way.

 

Demonstrate Thought Leadership

 

Social media is a good way to share medical information. Posts about wellness, weight control, diabetes or other medical conditions can provide information to patients and even those who may not be patients. Social media can help set a doctor up as an expert in certain medical conditions which can increase patients for the practice. Ending posts with a call-to-action that encourages readers to contact the office for an appointment can also increase the chance someone may choose the practice to treat a condition.

 

Keep HIPAA Regulations in Mind

 

It is important to remember that a healthcare provider cannot post items the same way a retailer or art gallery can on social media. Violating HIPAA rules can be very expensive and can actually damage your reputation with patients. Be sure that the people who can post on social media pages is limited and that they clearly understand HIPAA rules. It is recommended that staff members be offered refresher courses on HIPAA if they are permitted to post on social media.

 

Understand Patient Population

 

A pediatric practice will have a different approach to social media than a podiatrist. Many medical practices are age-specific and social media posts should keep this in mind. A geriatric specialist may not have many patients who are active on social media beyond Facebook while a pediatric practice may want a social media presence on several different platforms including Instagram and Snapchat. Posts will be different depending on your patient base as well so always keep that in mind when using social media.

 

Keep It Up To Date

 

The old saying “build it and they will come” is not true when it comes to social media. It is not enough to set up a page and then only post on it once every few months. Social media requires commitment so it is important to designate specific staff member who will be responsible for updating social media on a regular basis. Define a specific strategy such as increasing patient numbers by ten percent over the next year as well as a mission statement in order to create a working social media strategy.

 

Avoid Personal Commentary

 

It is tempting when posting on social media to respond to or post personal beliefs and commentary. However, it is important to look at the practice’s social media page as a business page and not a personal page. In fact, the AMA Code of Ethics has strict rules about some personal discussions like politics. The social media page for a practice is not the place to express views on politics or religion. Instead, keep that commentary to a personal page and avoid all discussions on the practice page, even if there are politically connected staff members in the practice.

 

Choose the Right Platforms

 

There are many options available for social media marketing and it is important to understand which is the most appropriate. For patient engagement, sites like Facebook, Twitter or Instagram may be beneficial. If the goal is to provide education, YouTube or LinkedIn might be the best option. There are also social media sites available on physician networks if the goal is educating peers. Adding a blog is another way to provide information and set up the practice as an expert in the medical field. Press releases are also forms of social media that can be used to announce changes in the practice or added services.

 

Public Forum

 

It is important to remember that all social media platforms are public forums. They should not be used to discuss private matters. It is fine to connect with patients on general health matters, but doctors should never discuss specific patient information, even in private messages. Even though Facebook and other social media sites offer the ability to discuss through private chat messages, it is not advised that doctors use that service to discuss personal matters as it may be accessible by others. This could risk the confidentiality of the patient. Instead, suggest that the patient call the office or reach out to them through a patient portal if the practice has one.


Branding is Critical

 

When creating a social media presence, it is important to keep the branding of the practice in mind. Use the practice logo or a picture of the building as a profile and cover photo. Use the same voice when posting messages. Be sure to end each post with a similar call-to-action that asks patients to call for an appointment.

 

Generate Interest

 

The best way to use social media is to generate interest and participation. The medium is designed for people to review, share and contribute information. It is a place for people to comment, support and even report negative experiences. Posts should be informative, interesting and encourage people to comment. Open-ended questions about healthcare, wellness or other aspects of the practice that encourage people to respond are excellent ways to encourage responses. Links to articles that support the practice or photos of success stories, with the proper permissions, are another way to encourage participation.


Legal Information

 

Defamation, libel, slander and plagiarism rules apply even on social media. Never make false statements that could harm a person or organization or post defamatory statements. Doing so could open the practice up to libel or slander charges. Be sure that all information posted is accurate, true and correct. Although linking to someone else’s article or blog post is perfectly acceptable, never use someone else’s words in a post or try to use someone else’s article as a blog claiming authorship. Plagiarism and copyright laws apply in the online world just as they do in the printed world.

 

Develop a Policy

 

The best way to handle social media in a medical practice is to develop a written policy that outlines exactly what social media will be used for. Explain if it is just to engage patients, to provide information or for other reasons. Be sure to include whether physicians in the practice will answer certain questions on their own. Be sure to communicate the policy with patients and obtain the appropriate releases if there is a chance that patient photos or other information will be included on social media.


Privacy Breaches

 

No matter how careful a practice may be, security breaches can occur. Even in physician-only groups, privacy breaches occur so it is important to have a plan in place for how security breaches will be handled. Occasionally review privacy policies on all social media platforms to be sure they meet HIPAA guidelines. Update any privacy settings in the practice that must be adjusted and avoid any chance of disseminating patient health information.

Social media is one of the best ways to promote businesses and its use is growing in almost every industry. Even with strict privacy laws, healthcare practices can use social media to develop a more casual relationship with patients, offer educational information and further increase their online presence.

 

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

About the Author:

Kristen Brady is the founder and owner of Kaboom Social Media, your social media marketing and content specialists! Follow her on Twitter: @kb54927

 

Managing Difficult Employees in Healthcare

Originally published on August 1, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Kristen Brady

There are difficult employees in every profession. However, a problem employee in healthcare can actually affect the patient care in an organization. As other staff members attempt to deal with an employee who is either difficult to work with or who has traits that other employees are unable to deal with, it is up to the manager to handle the situation. These tips can help healthcare managers deal with employees whose attitude, personality or work ethic is becoming a distraction in the workplace.


Everyone Can Be Difficult

 

The first thing to remember is that everyone can be difficult to work with at one point or another. An argument with a teenager or spouse just before they arrived at work can lead someone to be difficult during the work day. Stress at home or a heavy workload can make even the most easy going staff member snap at another sometimes. These are not the situations to be discussed, however. Problem employees are those who are chronically difficult to deal with. They argue their opinion over and over again or make decisions based on what benefits them rather than the team or the patient. Some may talk instead of listen while others may be disrespectful. In some cases, the behavior is a habit while others have developed the traits over time as a coping mechanism.

 

Four Types of Difficult Personalities

 

According to experts, there are four types of difficult personalities. The first is abrupt, domineering and arrogant. They use extreme aggression to get what they want and are not afraid to make a scene in public. The second is passive-aggressive. They often make negative remarks that they pass off as teasing. They often attempt to sabotage leaders and coworkers. The third is a constant complainer who whines and finds fault in everything. They feel it is their responsibility to complain in order to make things right, but they rarely offer solutions. The fourth is unresponsive and disengaged. They often shut down during conversations and avoid answering questions directly.

 

Managing Aggressive and Domineering Employees

 

The first step in managing an aggressive and domineering employee is to maintain composure. Aggressive people attempt to deliberately upset others so that they can take advantage by exploiting weaknesses. Although it may be difficult, the first step is to offer as little reaction as possible. Take a deep breath and count to ten before responding. If you reach ten and are still upset, take a time out by walking away in order to calm down. Tell the person that you will get back to them or to let you think about the discussion. Pick your battles as there are times dealing with an aggressive person is not worth your well-being or happiness. However, as a manager, allowing an aggressive person to continually show aggression in the workplace can undermine your authority. When you have to address their actions, approach them on their level and keep the conversation brief but targeted. Be sure to meet with them in private and not in front of other staff or patients. Clearly outline the impact of their behavior using specific examples. Be sure to treat them with respect and remain calm.

 

Benefits of Aggressive and Domineering Employees

 

Although aggressive and domineering employees can be difficult to work with, there are advantages to this type of personality type in the workplace. Domineering employees make excellent leaders, especially during a crisis. Their energy can help other employees stay focused and they may be more willing than others to take on new challenges. When discussing the actions of an aggressive person, be sure to point out their strengths. This could help them focus their energies on positive actions rather than negative ones.

 

Dealing with Passive-Aggressive Employees

 

A passive-aggressive employee has behaviors that appear to be passive but are actually directed and purposeful. The actions are intended to control others or assign a negative third-party perception so that they can avoid responsibility. It is sometimes difficult to recognize a passive-aggressive employee which makes them harder to control. Once you have identified that an employee is passive-aggressive, you must address their behavior directly. Be sure to focus on your own feelings and not the behavior. Never attack the character of a passive-aggressive employee and make sure you address the situation in private. Confront them about one behavior at a time rather than all at once. If they feel the need to retreat during the conversation, allow them to do so in a dignified manner. Set a time limit to meet with them as passive-aggressive employees have a tendency to let disagreements drag on. Be sure that the person understands that you care about them.

 

Passive-Aggressive Behavior in the Workplace

 

Unfortunately, there are no benefits to allowing a passive-aggressive person continue their behaviors in the workplace. In many cases, the passive-aggressive person has developed the behaviors because they have no insight into themselves. When confronted, they feel they are treated unfairly as they may not even realize they are angry and resentful. They tend to procrastinate and are very resistant to change. They have fragile egos and do not handle any form of criticism well. They withhold information about how they feel. When an employee demonstrates passive-aggressive behavior, it must be addressed quickly and efficiently in order to prevent significant damage to morale.

 

Dealing with a Constantly Complaining Employee

 

The constant complainer is a fountain of complaints in the workplace. In most cases, complainers can be ignored. Eventually, constant complaints will lead to a confrontation with either management or another employee. The first step to address constant complainers is to schedule a meeting in a private location. Set a time limit of no more than 15 minutes. From the beginning, express empathy. Often, constant complainers simply want to know they are heard. Show appreciation for them bringing the issue to your attention, but make no judgment on whether the complaints are valid. Do not try to convince them that the problems they see are not really an issue as you will not change their mind. Ask them to provide you with some solutions to the problem. If they are complaining about a co-worker, require them to deal directly with the other person. If they cannot without intervention, offer to mediate a meeting between the two of them. Ask if the complainer wants your opinion. In most cases, they will not. They simply want to be heard.

 

Benefits of Chronic Complainers

 

Although there are those who simply complain to be heard, chronic complainers can also draw attention to issues within an organization that management may be missing. Pay attention when people complain, even those who seem to complain about everything, as there may be some underlying truth to their complaints. By asking them to provide solutions, you will also learn whether their complaint has merit. If there is no valid solution, the complaint may not be valid.

 

Dealing with Unresponsive Employees

 

Disengaged and unresponsive employees have a lack of enthusiasm or commitment to the workplace. They basically “put in time” during each shift with no excitement or passion for their job. Disengagement is a growing problem in the workplace, especially among healthcare workers who are being pulled in many different directions. If you suspect an employee is disengaged, schedule a private meeting and specifically ask if there is a problem. Skip the small talk and get to the point immediately. Explain that they appear to be disinterested in patient care or another aspect of their job and ask if there is a problem. Listen and then confirm what they say to you. Repeat what they say in order to clarify that you heard them. Don’t pressure them to talk. One of the best questions to ask is “If this problem were solved today, how would your work performance change?” If the employee answers with confidence, they are willing to repair the situation. If they do not, they may be in the wrong position. End the meeting with a commitment to action and follow-up with written documentation of what that action will be.

 

Engagement and Happiness

It is important to understand that engagement and happiness are two different things. An employee who is engaged is invested in the organization. By determining what it is that is making the employee disengaged, you may be able to identify larger problems in the organization that need addressing as well.

Every manager will have to deal with a difficult employee at some point. Understanding the different types of difficult employees can help you learn the best way to manage them effectively, creating a better working environment for management and staff alike.

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

About the Author:

 

Kristen Brady is the founder and owner of Kaboom Social Media, your social media marketing and content specialists! Follow her on Twitter: @kb54927

 

Management Styles for Different Personality Types

Originally published on July 15, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Kristen Brady

Leading a team to success is the sign of a good manager. However, not every manager has the same management style. What may be even more surprising is that one manager may not have one leadership style as a good manager understands that management styles need to be mixed and matched in order to get the most out of their team members. They also understand that a management style that works with one employee may not work with another as each personality styles needs a different type of leadership.

 

Charismatic Management

 

A charismatic manager is able to influence others through the power of personality. They are often energetic and inspire passion in others by demonstrating their own. In some instances, a charismatic manager may seem to believe more in their own abilities than the team, but they still keep the team’s best interest in mind. Charismatic managers have the ability to expand a healthcare organization’s position in the market and improve morale in a team. A charismatic leader works best when an employee is introverted but wants their ideas heard. They have the ability to listen and make other members of the group feel heard. Employees who need reassurance and support are often best suited to working with a charismatic manager.

 

Innovative Management

 

An innovative leader often thinks outside the box. They are able to see the entire situation and develop solutions that are not what most people would be unable to see. They bring new, innovative ideas to the table and expect those ideas to be put into motion. An innovative leader is not afraid to take risks and, if they do fail, they see it as a learning experience. They are also more likely to listen to the ideas of others and implement those that may seem farfetched to some of the group. Employees who also enjoy thinking outside the box work well with an innovative manager. Those who enjoy spending hours in brainstorming sessions or who believe that the best ideas are those that seem outrageous or silly will thrive under an innovative management style.

 

Command and Control Management

 

Command and control managers appear to be rigid. They follow rules and expect others to do the same. When there is an urgency to a decision, they make the decision with little discussion, a benefit in some circumstances such as those that involve safety problems. These types of leaders also do well when decisions are financial or legal. Command and control managers are able to meet deadlines that seem impossible, but they demand immediate compliance. They often employ interactions that are from the top down. Command and control management work best with employees who are extremely detail-oriented and work best with a logical objective. Employees who do not like to be interrupted work best with this type of management system. In some cases, employees who are working on a detailed project may become what is known as “duty-fulfillers” in that they are focused on the project at hand, even if they are not normally that type of personality. In those cases, managers who allow those employees to complete the tasks they need to complete without interruption will see more production from them. This type of leadership also works well with employees who are traditionalists. These are people who like to get things done but use a systematic, methodical method to reach goals. They like organization and straightforward instructions.

 

Relaxed Management

 

The complete opposite of command and control management, relaxed managers have a thorough understanding of what is happening but keep themselves from being directly involved. They trust others to do as they are expected to do but they monitor all aspects of the team, providing feedback on a regular basis. This type of management works well in remote settings when team members are in various locations. They also work well when there are multiple leaders but a project has a strict deadline. Employees who prefer to work with little direction do well under a relaxed management style. These types of employees cannot handle micromanagement and prefer to work at their own pace. However, they also need occasional feedback to let them know they are still on track, which is one of the traits of a relaxed management style.

 

Role Model Management

 

A role model manager sets high performance standards for themselves and expects their team to meet the same standards. They are not “do as I say, not as I do” managers but act in the same way they expect their team to act. They are able to embrace new projects and work quickly to achieve goals. They also work well when results are needed quickly and action must be taken immediately to achieve those goals. Employee who seem to be very grounded work well with role model management. They want to see someone modeling their own behavior. These types of employees are rarely absent or late for work and they expect their leadership to adhere to the same principles. They will also be outspoken about other people’s behavior if it does not match their own.

 

Behind-the-Scenes Management

 

A behind-the-scenes manager includes the entire team in the decision-making process. They provide the tools necessary for the team to succeed, but they stay out of the limelight. Instead, they give the team credit for any results. This type of management often occurs when the leader is elected by an organization, committee or community. They often create a positive culture and have teams with better morale as results are team-oriented. Employees who are conventional, grounded and enjoy contributing will work well with a behind-the-scenes manager. They often work best on their own and may be introverted. They are loyal, hardworking and committed to the tasks they are assigned, but they want recognition for their hard work.

 

Situational Management

 

A situational manager links the behavior of group members with their readiness to complete a project. They are directing and supportive but also work to empower and coach those on the team. They are best suited for teams that need refinement or reinvention. Situational managers can sometimes be unpredictable. Employees who are in tune with the emotional environment work well with situational managers. They enjoy two-way communication and the fact that a situational manager will get to know them as a person, not just as an employee. This type of personality develops strong loyalty to a manager and works harder due to that loyalty.


Transitional Management

 

A transitional manager expects the group to conform even when conformation may be uncomfortable. They expect everyone on the team to do their best and, like the role model manager, performs in the same manner they expect the team to perform. They often encourage innovative ideas and motivate through optimism, enthusiasm and commitment. This type of management style works best with a nurturer personality style. This is a group member who works hard to get along with others and often offers assistance in an understated way. They often volunteer for community activities and are very optimistic.

 

Throughout an organization, there may be many personality styles. In fact, each employee may exhibit different personality styles depending on the tasks they are performing. The same is true of management. The best leaders exhibit multiple management styles in order to get the best from each person they manage. This may mean changing leadership styles several times a day or even several times an hour, depending on the task at hand. By adjusting leadership styles to meet personality styles, organizations see better morale and less turnover than those that retain the same management style for all staff members. By learning the personality style of those being managed, a good leader can achieve much more than those who simply use the same management style for everyone.

 

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

 

About the Author:

 

Kristen Brady is the founder and owner of Kaboom Social Media, your social media marketing and content specialists! Follow her on Twitter: @kb54927

 

Beyond EHR: How to Use Technology to Improve Patient Care

Originally published on June 20, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Kristen Brady

The use of technology in the medical profession has grown substantially over the past decade, yet many private practice physicians are not using the technology as extensively as they should. Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) required doctors throughout the country to begin implementing electronic health records (EHR), many private practices have not moved beyond recording patient treatments and test results in an electronic format. There are many new technologies available that provide patients with improved care. In addition, technology offers private practice doctors, nurses and administrators time-saving techniques that may allow more time working with patients and less time dealing with paperwork.

Real-Time Locating Systems

Hospitals have used real-time location systems (RTLS) to track mobile equipment for some time but it has recently begun to see use in private practice as well. Locator badges can be attached to staff ID badges, mobile equipment and even patient charts in an effort to improve the patient experience. The information from patient charts can be used to determine wait times and bottlenecks in the practice in order to improve times patients must wait to see a doctor. Equipment that must be moved from room-to-room in the practice can easily be tracked with the click of a mouse. The system can be used to monitor the amount of time staff spends on a certain task or identify areas where too much time is spent on administrative tasks rather than patient service.

Advanced Entertainment Systems

When patients must wait in an examination room for a physician to arrive, they rarely want to spend the time flipping through outdated magazines. Advanced entertainment systems are available that can occupy the patient as they wait and take their mind off any procedures that are impending. One of the best aspects of advanced entertainment systems is the availability of education videos that can be delivered directly to an exam room with details about any procedure that the patient may need to undergo. This is especially helpful for delivering instructions on after-treatment care although written instructions should still be provided.

Computerized Physician Order Entry

Although it is part of the EHR, computerized physician order entry actually adds another layer to the patient experience. Doctors are able to issue prescription and lab tests digitally. This eliminates errors associated with handwritten orders. Because the electronic records can be cross referenced, any orders that appear extreme or prescriptions that may interact with other medications. There have been studies that indicate computerized physician order entry can reduce medication errors by as much as 55 percent.

Mobile Apps

Over 75 percent of millennials feel that their doctor should offer them a mobile app to manage their care. There are many private practice apps available that will allow doctors to interact with their patients through their smartphone. Patients can schedule and confirm appointments, make payments and receive secure messages no matter where they are. There are even apps that allow patients to send photos of medical conditions like rashes or swollen joints, allowing healthcare practitioners the ability to determine if they need to be seen immediately or there are over-the-counter options available to resolve the problem.

Patient Portals

Patient portals are secure websites that allow patients to access their EHR from their home computer, smartphone or tablet. Portals work similar to apps in that patients can schedule, reschedule or confirm appointments, make payments and refill prescriptions without the need for a phone call. Patient portals are linked to the EHR so that patients can access test results, examination findings or other information they may need as part of their health record. In some cases, patients who have been referred to specialists may obtain copies of x-rays, MRI results or tests so they have them available the specialist’s appointment. Patient portals have shown to be particularly beneficial to patients with chronic illnesses such as diabetes. Because patients can interact with the physician in real-time, management of chronic illnesses is much more effective especially when combined with a behavior change program.

Cloud-Based Technology

In a recent survey, 58 percent of patients said that technology improves their experience with their doctor. At least five percent said that if their physician offered digital communication technology, they would be more likely to reach out to them and 46% would feel more at-ease asking questions. In addition, 43 percent said they would feel less rushed when asking questions if they could use digital technology. The use of telemedicine has also shown better patient experience. Doctors and patients can use two-way video, secure electronic communications and smartphones to discuss health-related issues. Doctors are also using telemedicine to monitor vital signs and to reach patients in rural settings who may have difficulty visiting the office. Because telemedicine allows for interaction between doctors and patients more quickly than an office visit, diagnosis and treatment can begin more quickly as well. For patients with chronic or long-term illnesses, the availability of home monitoring reduces the number of office visits and allows the patient to be more proactive in their care.

Hands Free Technology

There are many options for hands-free technology that allow physicians and nurses to record patient information without entering it through a keyboard, mouse or writing it down to be entered later. The patient and doctor can interact as the information is being entered. This also saves time that can be spent with the patient without overlapping other patient times. Doctors using hands-free devices have reported as much as a 70 percent increase in patient care.

Self-Check-In Kiosks

Patients have reported satisfaction with self-check-in kiosks at doctor’s offices that allow them to check in for an appointment and pay co-pays using a credit card. Kiosks take just over a minute and a half to check in a patient while manual check-ins take as much as three minutes. Doctors who have implemented such kiosks have reported a 96 percent increase in patient satisfaction. However, it is important to keep manual check-in available for patients who are not comfortable using the kiosk or who must pay cash for their co-payments.

Paperwork Reduction

With patient health records stored online, paperwork can be significantly reduced. However, many doctors are still requiring patients to complete paper forms that must be then entered into the computer system by an office employee or nurse. Patients must complete medical histories that include details about prescriptions, surgeries and medical issues they have faced in the past. They must provide insurance information and inform the doctor of family histories that could affect their own treatment. Technology now allows doctors to create online forms that the patient can complete from the comfort of their own home before they ever visit the doctor’s office. This allows the patient to take their time, gather information that pertains to their health and respond more thoroughly than through a paper checklist they attempt to complete while sitting in the waiting room. Patients can also update any information routinely by accessing forms through the patient portal so that the office always has the most current information as well as any changes to the patient’s health.

Although electronic health records are becoming standard in all private practices due to the Affordable Care Act, there are many other technologies available for private practices that are designed to improve patient experience. Many of the options are relatively inexpensive while others can be included with other forms of technology, such as patient record programs or cloud-based technology. By improving the technology in a private practice, physicians will find better patient satisfaction, the ability to spend more time with patients in a one-on-one situation and less stress for their staff as procedures are streamlined at the administrative level.

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

 

About the Author:

Kristen Brady is the founder and owner of Kaboom Social Media, your social media marketing and content specialists! Follow her on Twitter: @kb54927

Beyond EHR: How to Use Technology to Improve Patient Care

Originally published on June 20, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com.  By Kristen Brady

The use of technology in the medical profession has grown substantially over the past decade, yet many private practice physicians are not using the technology as extensively as they should. Although the Affordable Care Act (ACA) required doctors throughout the country to begin implementing electronic health records (EHR), many private practices have not moved beyond recording patient treatments and test results in an electronic format. There are many new technologies available that provide patients with improved care. In addition, technology offers private practice doctors, nurses and administrators time-saving techniques that may allow more time working with patients and less time dealing with paperwork.

Real-Time Locating Systems

Hospitals have used real-time location systems (RTLS) to track mobile equipment for some time but it has recently begun to see use in private practice as well. Locator badges can be attached to staff ID badges, mobile equipment and even patient charts in an effort to improve the patient experience. The information from patient charts can be used to determine wait times and bottlenecks in the practice in order to improve times patients must wait to see a doctor. Equipment that must be moved from room-to-room in the practice can easily be tracked with the click of a mouse. The system can be used to monitor the amount of time staff spends on a certain task or identify areas where too much time is spent on administrative tasks rather than patient service.

Advanced Entertainment Systems

When patients must wait in an examination room for a physician to arrive, they rarely want to spend the time flipping through outdated magazines. Advanced entertainment systems are available that can occupy the patient as they wait and take their mind off any procedures that are impending. One of the best aspects of advanced entertainment systems is the availability of education videos that can be delivered directly to an exam room with details about any procedure that the patient may need to undergo. This is especially helpful for delivering instructions on after-treatment care although written instructions should still be provided.

Computerized Physician Order Entry

Although it is part of the EHR, computerized physician order entry actually adds another layer to the patient experience. Doctors are able to issue prescription and lab tests digitally. This eliminates errors associated with handwritten orders. Because the electronic records can be cross referenced, any orders that appear extreme or prescriptions that may interact with other medications. There have been studies that indicate computerized physician order entry can reduce medication errors by as much as 55 percent.

Mobile Apps

Over 75 percent of millennials feel that their doctor should offer them a mobile app to manage their care. There are many private practice apps available that will allow doctors to interact with their patients through their smartphone. Patients can schedule and confirm appointments, make payments and receive secure messages no matter where they are. There are even apps that allow patients to send photos of medical conditions like rashes or swollen joints, allowing healthcare practitioners the ability to determine if they need to be seen immediately or there are over-the-counter options available to resolve the problem.

Patient Portals

Patient portals are secure websites that allow patients to access their EHR from their home computer, smartphone or tablet. Portals work similar to apps in that patients can schedule, reschedule or confirm appointments, make payments and refill prescriptions without the need for a phone call. Patient portals are linked to the EHR so that patients can access test results, examination findings or other information they may need as part of their health record. In some cases, patients who have been referred to specialists may obtain copies of x-rays, MRI results or tests so they have them available the specialist’s appointment. Patient portals have shown to be particularly beneficial to patients with chronic illnesses such as diabetes. Because patients can interact with the physician in real-time, management of chronic illnesses is much more effective especially when combined with a behavior change program.

Cloud-Based Technology

In a recent survey, 58 percent of patients said that technology improves their experience with their doctor. At least five percent said that if their physician offered digital communication technology, they would be more likely to reach out to them and 46% would feel more at-ease asking questions. In addition, 43 percent said they would feel less rushed when asking questions if they could use digital technology. The use of telemedicine has also shown better patient experience. Doctors and patients can use two-way video, secure electronic communications and smartphones to discuss health-related issues. Doctors are also using telemedicine to monitor vital signs and to reach patients in rural settings who may have difficulty visiting the office. Because telemedicine allows for interaction between doctors and patients more quickly than an office visit, diagnosis and treatment can begin more quickly as well. For patients with chronic or long-term illnesses, the availability of home monitoring reduces the number of office visits and allows the patient to be more proactive in their care.

Hands Free Technology

There are many options for hands-free technology that allow physicians and nurses to record patient information without entering it through a keyboard, mouse or writing it down to be entered later. The patient and doctor can interact as the information is being entered. This also saves time that can be spent with the patient without overlapping other patient times. Doctors using hands-free devices have reported as much as a 70 percent increase in patient care.

Self-Check-In Kiosks

Patients have reported satisfaction with self-check-in kiosks at doctor’s offices that allow them to check in for an appointment and pay co-pays using a credit card. Kiosks take just over a minute and a half to check in a patient while manual check-ins take as much as three minutes. Doctors who have implemented such kiosks have reported a 96 percent increase in patient satisfaction. However, it is important to keep manual check-in available for patients who are not comfortable using the kiosk or who must pay cash for their co-payments.

Paperwork Reduction

With patient health records stored online, paperwork can be significantly reduced. However, many doctors are still requiring patients to complete paper forms that must be then entered into the computer system by an office employee or nurse. Patients must complete medical histories that include details about prescriptions, surgeries and medical issues they have faced in the past. They must provide insurance information and inform the doctor of family histories that could affect their own treatment. Technology now allows doctors to create online forms that the patient can complete from the comfort of their own home before they ever visit the doctor’s office. This allows the patient to take their time, gather information that pertains to their health and respond more thoroughly than through a paper checklist they attempt to complete while sitting in the waiting room. Patients can also update any information routinely by accessing forms through the patient portal so that the office always has the most current information as well as any changes to the patient’s health.

Although electronic health records are becoming standard in all private practices due to the Affordable Care Act, there are many other technologies available for private practices that are designed to improve patient experience. Many of the options are relatively inexpensive while others can be included with other forms of technology, such as patient record programs or cloud-based technology. By improving the technology in a private practice, physicians will find better patient satisfaction, the ability to spend more time with patients in a one-on-one situation and less stress for their staff as procedures are streamlined at the administrative level.

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

 

About the Author:

Kristen Brady is the founder and owner of Kaboom Social Media, your social media marketing and content specialists! Follow her on Twitter: @kb54927

Job Satisfaction: More Than Just Financial Compensation

Originally published on June 1, 2016 at www.lmshealthpro.com By Sonda Eunus, MHA

Most of us spend more time at work than we do at home, and more time with our coworkers than with our friends and families. For this reason, our job greatly influences all aspects of our life. Any job is better than no job; or is it? Many studies have been done that have linked high levels of work-related stress with depression and anxiety. Some jobs are more likely than others to cause negative feelings. Jobs and careers that expose the ugly sides of people tend to lead to higher stress and depression—these include judges, lawyers, police officers, etc (Worth, 2010). Additionally, physicians, nurses, and others, working in the medical field who witness death and illness on an everyday basis also tend to experience work-related sadness and discomfort. However, all jobs and professions also have their own pros and cons. The culture of the organization counts a lot, and can either encourage creativity and growth in employees, or discourage them and leave them feeling inadequate and unappreciated.

Job satisfaction has been said to stem from a quality of work life that provides employees with a favorable work environment, rewards for achievements, job security, and career development opportunities. The concept of person-situation fit is greatly related to job satisfaction, which states that when a person’s beliefs and goals are similar to the values of their organization, they will experience greater job satisfaction. Additionally, when these individual and organizational goals are aligned, the employee will perform better and, ideally, get praised and rewarded for her performance—which will only increase job satisfaction even more (Olsen, Maple & Stage, 1995). Additionally, when a person truly enjoys what she does for a living, she will naturally perform better and be more motivated to work harder in order to achieve career goals and further her knowledge and skill set.

Famous American psychologist Abraham Maslow, in his hierarchy of needs theory, postulated that a person’s basic needs, such as food and housing, must be met before higher-level needs can be addressed, such as self-actualization. Similarly, psychologist Fredrick Herzberg posited that motivation can be broken down into two factors: motivators and hygienes. Hygienes are lower-level needs that must first be met to inspire motivation, and in terms of job satisfaction these hygienes represent factors such as supervision, salary, work environment, and work relationships. These factors do not directly promote job satisfaction; however, the lack or inadequacy of these factors, do cause job dissatisfaction. Motivators, on the other hand, inspire motivation and effort, and consequently job satisfaction and self-actualization. Such motivators include responsibility, achievement, recognition, promotion, and various intrinsic values (Mind Tools, 2016). For women especially, work-life balance is extremely important. As the primary caregivers for their children, many women struggle to keep up with both their career obligations and their motherly duties. For this reason many women are at a disadvantage when competing with men for prestigious and coveted positions. A job that requires women to work excessive amounts of hours and neglect their personal and motherly responsibilities will undoubtedly lead to job dissatisfaction or resignation—regardless of the pay, work environment, or benefits that may be offered.

Contrary to popular belief, financial compensation is not the main factor that determines an employees’ job satisfaction. Feeling at home at work—experiencing person-situation fit—will greatly boost an employee’s satisfaction at work, and will motivate that person to come to work every day and to work to their full potential. Additionally, competent managers should be available to properly train and assist the employee to achieve superior performance, and praise that employee for their progress and achievement. Everyone wants to feel that their work is being noticed and appreciated. Employees also want to know that there is opportunity for advancement, and many good employees have left their jobs simply because they have capped out their growth potential at that organization. Most importantly, every employee should feel that their work is making a difference and that they are progressing in life. When all of these factors are present, employees will experience greater job satisfaction and will in return work to their fullest potential to promote the growth and success of their organization.

 

Leading Management Solutions helps medical practice leaders identify ways to improve operations to increase revenue, employee engagement, and patient satisfaction. Learn more about us at www.lmshealthpro.com.

About the Author:

Sonda Eunus is the Founder and CEO of Leading Management Solutions, a healthcare management consulting company (www.lmshealthpro.com). Along with a team of experienced and knowledgeable consultants, she works with healthcare practice managers to improve practice operations, train employees, increase practice revenue, and much more. She holds a Masters in Healthcare Management and a BA in Psychology.

https://www.linkedin.com/in/sonda-eunus-6895067b

 

References:

Worth, T. (2010). Why your job is making you depressed. CNN. Retrieved from: http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/10/01/health.job.making.depressed/

Herzberg’s motivators and hygiene factors. (2016) Mind Tools. Retrieved from: https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/herzberg-motivators-hygiene-factors.htm

Maple, S. A., Olsen, D., Stage, F. (1995). Women and minority faculty job satisfaction: professional role interests, professional satisfactions, and institutional fit. Journal of Higher Education, 66(3), 267-293.